The EU’s Digital Laws and the Future of Tech Regulation

Europe’s new digital laws, the Digital Services Act (DSA) and the Digital Markets Act (DMA), aim to regulate social media and prevent unfair competition by big tech firms. These laws are entering a critical phase, with the European Commission designating “gatekeeper” firms that will have to comply or face fines.

Furthermore, the EU is negotiating an AI Act, which may impose significant changes on AI models used by tech companies like Alphabet’s Bard and OpenAI’s ChatGPT. A study by Stanford University found that none of the top ten AI models evaluated were compliant with the draft passed by the European Parliament in June.

The implementation of these new laws has raised questions about the EU’s role as a global regulator. Two new books, “Digital Empires” by Anu Bradford and “Underground Empire” by Henry Farrell and Abraham Newman, offer different perspectives on the matter.

In “Digital Empires,” Anu Bradford argues that the EU will continue to be a primary source of regulatory constraint for the tech industry. She suggests that America will be forced to adopt elements of the EU’s model due to growing criticism of its market-driven approach.

On the other hand, Farrell and Newman’s “Underground Empire” offers a gloomier view for the EU. They argue that the United States, through its control of financial networks, uses its power to influence other countries.

While the Brussels effect, which describes the global influence of EU laws, may still apply to the DSA and DMA, the authors suggest that the outcome will be different in the realm of AI. The EU’s global position in AI is weaker compared to the US, with a significantly smaller contribution to AI models and less private investment.

The US is also working on developing its own regulatory network for AI, attempting to neutralize Europe’s role as the rule-setter. This poses a challenge for the EU, which should redouble its efforts to strengthen its own AI industry and encourage businesses to adopt the technology, according to experts.

In conclusion, while the EU’s digital laws have the potential to cement its role as a regulator in the virtual world, challenges lie ahead in the AI space. The EU must continue to innovate and strengthen its AI capabilities to stay relevant in the global tech landscape.

Sources:
– Title: Europe’s tech regulations could define the future of the virtual world
– Author: The Economist
– Title: Digital Empires
– Author: Anu Bradford
– Title: Underground Empire
– Authors: Henry Farrell and Abraham Newman

The EU’s Digital Laws and the Future of Tech Regulation

The EU’s Digital Laws and the Future of Tech Regulation

The EU’s Digital Laws and the Future of Tech Regulation

The EU’s Digital Laws and the Future of Tech Regulation



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